FEDERAL REG

Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Parts I and III — Airport Winter Maintenance)

PROPOSED FEDERAL REGULATION - VIA PART I OF THE GAZETTE

Proposed
May 28, 2016


REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT (This statement is not part of the Regulations.) Issues Between 2010 and 2015, 211 events at 76 Canadian airports could be attributable to poor winter maintenance. Several aircraft were damaged due to poor snow and ice removal, poor communication with airport winter maintenance vehicles or poor communication of the runway conditions at airports, such as outdat... (Click for more)


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Published on May 28, 2016

Bill Summary

Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Parts I and III — Airport Winter Maintenance)

REGULATORY IMPACT ANALYSIS STATEMENT (This statement is not part of the Regulations.) Issues Between 2010 and 2015, 211 events at 76 Canadian airports could be attributable to poor winter maintenance. Several aircraft were damaged due to poor snow and ice removal, poor communication with airport winter maintenance vehicles or poor communication of the runway conditions at airports, such as outdated information or no information available at all. No lives were lost nor were there injuries reported. The lack of mandated requirements and the inconsistent methods used to assess and report runway surface conditions have resulted in confusion for all applicable parties, which leads to flight crews having to familiarize themselves with each airport’s method for winter maintenance rather than being able to utilize common and reliable practices to employ a consistent level of service. Background Until the 1990s, airports in Canada were owned, operated or subsidized by the federal government, through Transport Canada. Beginning in 1992, control of Canadian airports started to be transferred to local airport authorities. While no longer operating these airports, Transport Canada continues to provide safety and security through aviation regulation and airport certification. (see footnote 1) Since the devolution of airport ownership to non-governmental entities, there have been minimal regulatory requirements for airport winter maintenance operations in the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) and in the Aerodromes Standards and Recommended Practices. (see footnote 2) Industry has relied more on guidance material provided in Transport Canada’s Advisory Circular (AC) Airport Winter Maintenance and Planning (see footnote 3) (Winter Maintenance AC) in order to structure its winter maintenance operations. Winter maintenance procedures are tasks performed at airports during the winter season to maintain aviation safety in areas impacted by winter weather; such tasks include, but are not limited to, the removal of contaminants (for example ice and snow) from runways and providing runway friction measurements to air carriers operating at a particular airport. The Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) identified approach-and-landing accidents and risk of collisions on runways on their Watchlist 2014. The TSB has stated that timely and accurate runway surface condition information is required, because pilots must calculate the distance to perform a safe landing distance as snow, rain, or ice can affect this landing distance, which could increase the risk of approach-and-landing accidents. Also, the TSB has stated that there is an ongoing risk of aircraft colliding with vehicles or other aircraft on the ground at Canadian airports, which could include airport winter maintenance vehicles. In order to ensure winter maintenance activities are consistently performed at all required airports, Transport Canada is proposing a regulatory amendment to the CARs in order to include provisions for winter maintenance. This regulatory amendment would impact airports at which aeroplanes subject to the regulatory requirements under CARs Subparts 705 (Airline Operations), 704 (Commuter Operations) and 703 (Air Taxi Operations) operate their air transport services. An air transport service consists of commercial air service that is operated for the purpose of transporting persons, personal belongings, baggage, goods or cargo in an aircraft between two points. Objective The objective of this proposal is to regulate and standardize winter maintenance operations at airports and to ensure that reliable and timely information is available to air operators when making take-off and landing decisions at airports during the winter months. Currently, there are minimal regulatory requirements in the CARs and in the Aerodromes Standards and Recommended Practices. In addition, airport operators are encouraged to plan and conduct winter maintenance based on the Winter Maintenance AC; however, Transport Canada Advisory Circulars are intended to provide information and guidance regarding operational matters and are not regulatory requirements. The purpose of the proposed Regulations is to introduce the information in the Winter Maintenance AC as regulatory requirements. Description In order to ensure winter maintenance operations are consistently performed at all required airports, Transport Canada is proposing a regulatory amendment to the CARs to include provisions for winter maintenance and to introduce associated standards for these provisions, i.e. the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance (Winter Maintenance Standards). This regulatory amendment would impact airports at which aeroplanes subject to CARs Subparts 705, 704 and 703 operate their air transport services. To help achieve this objective, the proposed Regulations would require impacted airport operators to develop winter maintenance plans, friction measurement procedures, and training; the proposed Regulations would further introduce requirements related to the winter maintenance operations of runways and priority areas to increase the predictability of the availability of airport access during the winter season. As well, the proposed Regulations would require accurate and timely reporting of movement area surface conditions at airports during winter operations. Currently, a vast majority of airports are voluntarily fulfilling these proposed requirements, as they are suggested practices in the Winter Maintenance AC; however, the practices are not consistently applied across Canada and some airports are not applying them at all. The proposed Regulations would establish requirements in the following areas: Winter maintenance planning — airport operators, in consultation with air operators, would be required to develop a plan for how winter maintenance operations would be conducted. The plan would include specific information related to priority areas, safety procedures and the coordination of the activities among the airport staff involved in winter maintenance operations. Ice control chemicals and sands — airport operators would be required to use ice control chemicals specific for use around aircraft, which would be outlined in Transport Canada’s Winter Maintenance Standards. The proposed Regulations would require the use of sand that meets specific requirements and outline the removal of the sand when it is no longer required, which would also be outlined in the Winter Maintenance Standards. Friction measurement — the use of a decelerometer for friction measurement readings would be required, as would procedures for determining the Canadian runway friction index (CRFI), which allows pilots to determine if they can safely take off and land on a contaminated runway. If airport operators are not currently equipped, these proposed requirements would require the purchase of a decelerometer and the training of airport personnel to take the measurements. Maximum snow accumulation slope (%) on or adjacent to threshold areas and adjacent to runways and taxiways — in order to prevent damage to aircraft while they are landing, taking off or taxiing, the proposed Regulations would not permit snow to accumulate on or adjacent to threshold areas or adjacent to runways or taxiways in a manner that interferes with the operation of aeroplanes. The details of this would be provided in the Winter Maintenance Standards. Movement area inspections and reports — the conditions that determine when inspections are required and the minimum frequency for inspections would be established to ensure that the information provided to pilots is accurate. The Winter Maintenance Standards would outline the requirement for daily inspections or when there is a significant change in the runway surface conditions. They would also outline the requirements in cases when contaminants are present on a movement area. Training — airport personnel would be required to be trained to accomplish their assigned tasks related to winter maintenance operations, such as the reporting of surface conditions and the use of the decelerometer. Training records — records of mandatory training would be required to be maintained for Transport Canada verification. The proposed Regulations would also provide a compliance option to airports that service only CARs Subpart 703 air operators. These airports will be able to choose to comply with the full set of proposed Regulations or to consult annually with air operators on winter maintenance operations. They will then determine the level of service that they will offer and provide this information for publication in the Canada Flight Supplement. Consultation The proposed Regulations were developed by the Transport Canada Working Group on Airport Winter Maintenance and Planning, which was established in November 2000. Active members of the Canadian Aviation Regulation Advisory Council (CARAC) who participated in the development of these amendments include industry stakeholders, such as the Canadian Airports Council (CAC), the Air Transport Association of Canada, unions (e.g. the Air Line Pilots Association and the Canadian Union of Public Employees), representatives of other levels of government (e.g. the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario), and representatives of other federal government departments (e.g. the Department of National Defence). During the development of the proposed Regulations, a technical committee meeting was held in September 2001 during which a number of differing views were expressed. The majority of the concerns raised related to the view that the proposed Regulations would be overly prescriptive. For example, the requirement for the limits on the height and slope of snow banks beside the runway or the CRFI friction measurement requirement would only apply at airports with paved surfaces and scheduled turbo-jet-powered aeroplanes with 30 days’ advance notice. However, the Air Line Pilots Association advocated for wider application of the CRFI, expressing the view that certain smaller aeroplanes have the same braking systems and reverse thrust capability as the larger ones. In 2002, Transport Canada responded by stating there is no safety issue with the proposed Regulations and the intent of the regulatory requirements would be to provide winter maintenance services to commercial passenger-carrying aeroplanes. With respect to the proposal being too prescriptive, it was noted that the standard in place at the time did not permit any build-up of snow beside a runway; therefore, the proposed amendment would be more lenient for airport operators. A Notice of Proposed Amendment (NPA) was shared with industry and was presented at a Civil Aviation Regulatory Committee (CARC) meeting in January 2002 at which the NPA was approved. Following the CARC response and approval of the NPA, action was taken to establish an internal working group to review definitions as requested by industry. A related 2003 NPA was created to clarify definitions and was fully consulted on at a technical committee meeting in May 2003 and accepted by those in attendance at a meeting in October 2003. The proposed Regulations were published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on March 21, 2009, and Transport Canada received 24 comments. Comments were received from airport operators, provincial governments, air operators and airport councils. Generally, there was opposition to the proposed Regulations, which were viewed as being too prescriptive. As a large portion of the comments received following the Canada Gazette, Part I, publication were in support of the views expressed by the CAC, the largest representative of airport operators in Canada, Transport Canada met with officials from the CAC to explain the intent of the new proposed Regulations. Following this, both the CAC and the Regional Community Airports of Canada indicated to Transport Canada in 2012 that they were satisfied with the proposed Regulations. Given the length of time that has elapsed since the 2009 prepublication period, a second prepublication is now warranted. Transport Canada is of the view that air operators using smaller northern airports operated by certain provinces and territories may not be fully supportive of the proposed Regulations because of the associated increase in cost to operate these airports. “One-for-One” Rule The “One-for-One Rule” applies to this regulatory proposal and is considered an “IN” under the Rule. Of the 212 airports impacted by these proposed Regulations, 6 airports were identified as business-owned airports. The proposed Regulations would increase administrative costs to all airports, as they would be required to maintain records to demonstrate their winter maintenance plans, which would include copying and filing their winter maintenance plans and training records, and would require them to submit these documents to the Minister of Transport should they be requested to do so. However, given that the intent of the “One-for-One” Rule is to quantify incremental administrative costs to businesses, the administrative costs were only quantified for the six airports that were identified as business-owned. Based on expert analysis and advice by Transport Canada, the administrative costs associated with these proposed Regulations would be estimated to have an annualized cost of $177 for all six business-owned airports. This estimate of administrative costs is based on 15 minutes annually to copy and file the winter maintenance plan and training records at each airport and 30 minutes annually to submit these records to the Minister of Transport if requested. Small business lens The proposed Regulations increase compliance costs for small business, but the total cost associated with the implementation of the proposed Regulations is less than $1 million, and the costs to small businesses are not disproportionately high. Therefore, the small business lens does not apply. Rationale The proposed Regulations would standardize winter maintenance operations and improve consistency and reliability of the reporting of runway surface information during severe winter weather, which would lead to safer transportation for those using Canadian airports in winter by increasing the predictability of airport access during this crucial time of the year. The proposed Regulations would regulate the use of both ice control chemicals and sand, as inappropriate chemicals or the improper use of chemicals could have a negative impact on an aircraft or the runway and sand could cause foreign object damage to an aircraft if the proper size is not used in the proper method. The proposed Regulations would only be applicable to land airports in Canada of which there are currently 304. The following is a breakdown as to the impact these proposed Regulations would have on these airports: the proposed Regulations would minimally impact 202 airports, as these airports already have existing maintenance plans and training programs; however, they would need to review their existing maintenance plans and training programs to ensure compliance with the proposed Regulations. These airports either already provide friction measurements or would not be required to do so based on the types of aeroplanes serviced by the airport or the type of runway; therefore, they would not be required to purchase a decelerometer. ten airports (Cambridge Bay, Churchill Falls, Kugluktuk, La Ronge, Lourdes-de-Blanc-Sablon, Powell River, Rimouski, Saint-Augustin, Salmon Arm and Trois-Rivières) currently conduct minimal winter maintenance operations; however, they would be required to review and update their current winter maintenance plans. These airports do not currently provide friction measurements and would be required to do so; therefore, they would need to purchase a decelerometer, which Transport Canada estimates would be $5,000 per airport and would have an estimated useful life longer than 10 years. They would be required to do initial training with their employees on the updated winter maintenance plan, including the conduct of friction measurements, as well as any ongoing training that may be required based on future amendments to the plan. Transport Canada estimates that the cost for initial training would be $5,000 per airport and that any ongoing training due to changes in the winter maintenance plan would become part of the airport’s previously established training regime. Overall, Transport Canada estimates that the cumulative cost to these 10 airports would be approximately $100,000 and would expect that these expenses be carried in the first year after publication of the proposed Regulations in the Canada Gazette, Part II, prior to their coming into force. fifty-one airports do not receive commercial air services, so they would be unaffected by the proposed Regulations. forty-one airports would not be required to increase winter maintenance services beyond those that they already offer because of the type of air transport service operations taking place at these airports. These airports service only CARs Subpart 703 operators (Air Taxi Operations) and are provided the option to comply with either the full set of proposed requirements or to consult annually with air operators on winter maintenance. They will then determine the level of service that they will offer and provide this information for publication in the Canada Flight Supplement. These airports would have alternative requirements, as the steps to maintain safety in the winter is different due to the weight of the aeroplanes operating at these airports. Of the total 212 airports impacted by these proposed Regulations, Transport Canada estimates that the cumulative compliance cost would be $100,000 for 10 airports, of which one was identified as a business-owned airport, and that the annualized administrative cost would be $177 for 6 business-owned airports. There would be no anticipated additional costs to government for the enforcement of these proposed Regulations, as Transport Canada would include the surveillance of these proposed Regulations in its regular monitoring activities. Implementation, enforcement and service standards The proposed amendments would be enforced through the assessment of administrative monetary penalties imposed under sections 7.6 to 8.2 of the Aeronautics Act, through suspension or cancellation of a Canadian aviation document or through judicial action introduced by way of summary conviction as per section 7.3 of the Aeronautics Act. The proposed Regulations would come into force on the first anniversary of the day on which they are published in the Canada Gazette, Part II. At the same time as the coming-into-force date of the proposed Regulations, the associated Winter Maintenance Standards will be made available to the public through Transport Canada’s CARAC Activity Reporting System. Contact Chief Regulatory Affairs (AARBH) Civil Aviation Safety and Security Group Department of Transport Place de Ville, Tower C 330 Sparks Street Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N5 Telephone (general inquiries): 613-993-7284 or 1-800-305-2059 Fax: 613-990-1198 Internet address: http://www.tc.gc.ca PROPOSED REGULATORY TEXT Notice is given that the Governor in Council, pursuant to section 4.9 (see footnote a) and paragraphs 7.6(1)(a) (see footnote b) and (b) (see footnote c)‍ of the Aeronautics Act (see footnote d), proposes to make the annexed Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Parts I and III — Airport Winter Maintenance). Interested persons may make representations with respect to the proposed Regulations to the Minister of Transport within 30 days after the date of publication of this notice. All representations must be in writing and cite the Canada Gazette, Part I, and the date of publication of this notice. Each representation must be sent to the Chief, Regulatory Affairs (AARBH), Civil Aviation, Safety and Security Group, Department of Transport, Place de Ville, Tower C, 330 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0N5 (general inquiries — tel.: 613-993-7284 or 1-800-305-2059; fax: 613-990-1198; Internet address: http://www.tc.gc.ca). Ottawa, May 19, 2016 Jurica Čapkun Assistant Clerk of the Privy Council Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (Parts I and III — Airport Winter Maintenance) Amendments 1 Subsection 101.01(1) of the Canadian Aviation Regulations (see footnote 4) is amended by adding the following in alphabetical order: ice means water that has frozen on a surface, and includes the condition commonly known as black ice and the condition in which compacted snow has turned into a polished ice surface; (glace) 2 Subpart 2 of Part III of Schedule II to Subpart 3 of Part I of the Regulations is amended by adding the following after the reference “Section 302.308”: This table presents the amendments to Subpart 2 of Part III of Schedule II to Subpart 3 of Part I of the Regulations. Column I Designated Provision Column II Maximum Amount of Penalty ($) Column II Maximum Amount of Penalty ($) Column I Designated Provision Individual Corporation Section 302.403 1,000 5,000 Subsection 302.406(1) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.406(2) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.410(1) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.410(4) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.412(1)(a) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.412(1)(b) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.412(2) 1,000 5,000 Subsection 302.412(3) 1,000 5,000 Section 302.413 3,000 15,000 Section 302.414 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.415(1) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.415(2) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.416(1) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.417(1)(a) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.417(1)(b) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.417(1)(c) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.417(1)(d) 3,000 15,000 Paragraph 302.417(1)(e) 1,000 5,000 Subsection 302.417(2) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.418(1) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.418(2) 3,000 15,000 Subsection 302.418(3) 3,000 15,000 Section 302.419 1,000 5,000 3 Division IV of Subpart 2 of Part III of the Regulations is replaced by the following: Division IV — Airport Winter Maintenance Interpretation 302.401 The following definitions apply in this Division. AMSCR or Aircraft Movement Surface Condition Report means a report that details the surface conditions of all movement areas at an airport, including runways and taxiways. (AMSCR ou compte rendu de l’état de la surface pour les mouvements d’aéronefs) contaminant means material that collects on a surface, including standing water, slush, snow, compacted snow, ice, frost, sand, and ice control chemicals. (contaminant) CRFI or Canadian runway friction index means the average of the friction measurements taken on runway surfaces on which freezing or frozen contaminants are present. (CRFI ou coefficient canadien de frottement sur piste) ice control chemicals means chemicals used to prevent ice formation, to prevent ice from bonding to a surface, or to break up or melt ice on a surface. (produits chimiques de déglaçage) loose snow means freshly fallen, dry, drifting snow or old standing snow that is neither compacted on nor bonded to a surface. (neige folle) priority 1 area means an airside area that, based on prevailing winds and operational requirements, is necessary in order to maintain the operational capability of an airport, and includes the features referred to in paragraph 322.411(1)(a) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. (zone de priorité 1) priority 2 area means an airside area that is necessary in order to provide additional runway availability should wind conditions or operational requirements change, and includes the features referred to in paragraph 322.411(1)(b) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. (zone de priorité 2) priority 3 area means an airside area that is not a priority 1 area or a priority 2 area, and includes the features referred to in paragraph 322.411(1)(c) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. (zone de priorité 3) sand means small particles of crushed angular mineral aggregates or natural sand material used to improve runway surface friction levels. (sable) slush means partially melted snow or ice, with a high water content, from which water can readily flow. (neige fondante) wet snow means snow that will stick together when compressed but will not readily allow water to flow from it if squeezed. (neige mouillée) Application 302.402 (1) Subject to paragraph (2)(b), section 302.406 applies in respect of an airport if aeroplanes at the airport are operated in an air transport service under Subpart 3 of Part VII. (2) Sections 302.410 to 302.419 apply in respect of an airport if (a) aeroplanes at the airport are operated in an air transport service under Subpart 4 or 5 of Part VII; or (b) aeroplanes at the airport are operated in an air transport service under Subpart 3 of Part VII and the operator of the airport has decided to comply with those sections instead of section 302.406. Notification 302.403 The operator of an airport referred to in paragraph 302.402(2)(b) shall (a) provide the Minister, at least 60 days before implementing a decision to comply with sections 302.410 to 302.419 instead of section 302.406, with notice in writing of that decision; (b) provide the Minister, at least 60 days before implementing a decision to resume complying with section 302.406, with notice in writing of that decision; and (c) notify the air operators that use the airport, and the air navigation services provider, of any change in the level of service provided at the airport as a result of a decision referred to in paragraph (a) or (b). [302.404 to 302.405 reserved] Winter Maintenance Measures 302.406 (1) Each year, before the start of winter maintenance operations, the operator of an airport shall (a) consult a representative sample of the air operators that use the airport about the intended level of winter maintenance, and keep a record of the consultations; (b) provide the aeronautical information publications provider with information, for publication in the Canada Flight Supplement, about the level of winter maintenance; and (c) include in the airport operations manual information about the level of winter maintenance. (2) The operator of the airport shall use AMSCRs to report the surface conditions of all movement areas, and shall forward the AMSCRs to the air navigation services provider. [302.407 to 302.409 reserved] Airport Winter Maintenance Plan 302.410 (1) The operator of an airport shall have an airport winter maintenance plan that (a) was developed by the operator after consultations with a representative sample of the air operators that use the airport; and (b) sets out or includes all the items required under section 302.411. (2) The operator of the airport shall review its airport winter maintenance plan at least once a year as well as each time the operator fails to clear a priority area in accordance with the plan. (3) If the operator of the airport determines, as a result of a review, that its airport winter maintenance plan should be amended, the operator shall consult a representative sample of the air operators that use the airport and amend the plan. (4) The operator of the airport shall keep at the airport (a) an up-to-date copy of its airport winter maintenance plan; (b) a record of all consultations required under this section; and (c) a record of each review required under this section. Content 302.411 An airport winter maintenance plan shall set out or include (a) procedures for identifying which airside areas are priority 1 areas, priority 2 areas or priority 3 areas during winter storm conditions; (b) a description of the winter maintenance operations to be carried out in an airside area once it is identified as a priority 1 area, a priority 2 area or a priority 3 area; (c) communication procedures that meet the requirements of subsection 322.411(2) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance; (d) procedures for publishing a NOTAM in the event of winter conditions that might be hazardous to aircraft operations or affect the use of movement areas and facilities used to provide services relating to aeronautics; (e) safety procedures for controlling the flow of ground vehicles during winter maintenance operations in order to ensure the safety of persons, vehicles and aircraft; (f) procedures for minimizing the risk of ice control chemicals — other than the ice control chemicals specified in subsection 322.415(1) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance — being tracked onto an airside area; (g) a description of the lines of authority and organizational relationships with respect to winter maintenance, including contact names and telephone numbers; (h) a description of how actions undertaken as part of winter maintenance will be coordinated; (i) a description of the arrangements for snow clearance; (j) a description of the process for reviewing and amending the plan; (k) a description of the administrative procedure for distributing the plan and its amendments; and (l) a list of all agreements respecting the provision of winter maintenance services for navigation aids at the airport, and signed copies of those agreements. Clearance of Priority Areas 302.412 (1) The operator of an airport who decides to operate the airport during winter storm conditions shall (a) keep priority 1 areas clear at all times; (b) keep priority 2 areas clear to the extent that doing so does not compromise the operator’s ability to keep priority 1 areas clear; and (c) clear priority 3 areas after the winter storm conditions have ended. (2) If the operator of the airport fails to clear a priority area in accordance with its airport winter maintenance plan, the operator shall make a record of the event and its circumstances. (3) The operator of the airport shall keep a record referred to in subsection (2) for two years after the date of the event. Snow Accumulation on or Adjacent to Threshold Areas 302.413 The operator of an airport shall prevent snow that has accumulated on or adjacent to threshold areas from interfering with the operation of aeroplanes by clearing and banking the snow in a manner that meets or exceeds the specifications set out in section 322.413 of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. Snow Accumulation Adjacent to Runways or Taxiways 302.414 The operator of an airport shall prevent snow that has accumulated adjacent to runways or taxiways from interfering with the operation of aeroplanes by clearing and banking the snow in a manner that meets or exceeds the specifications set out in section 322.414 of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. Ice Control Chemicals and Sand 302.415 (1) The operator of an airport shall, on movement areas, use only (a) the ice control chemicals specified in subsection 322.415(1) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance; and (b) sand that meets the requirements specified in subsection 322.415(2) of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. (2) The operator of the airport shall remove sand from movement areas, with the exception of gravel runways, as soon as the sand is no longer required in order to provide friction for aeroplanes and service vehicles. Friction Measurement 302.416 (1) The operator of an airport shall (a) carry out CRFI measurements in accordance with section 322.416 of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance; (b) determine CRFIs in accordance with section 322.416 of that standard; (c) provide the CRFIs to the ground station in accordance with subsection 322.411(2) of that standard; and (d) maintain the accuracy of the equipment referred to in section 322.416 of that standard in accordance with that section. (2) Subsection (1) does not apply if (a) the airport does not receive any aeroplanes operated in an air transport service under Subpart 5 of Part VII; or (b) all of the runways are gravel and the airport does not receive turbo-jet-powered aeroplanes operated in an air transport service under Subpart 5 of Part VII. Movement Area Inspections and Reports 302.417 (1) The operator of an airport shall (a) inspect movement areas and prepare AMSCRs in accordance with section 322.417 of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance; (b) include a CRFI in each AMSCR if section 302.416 applies to the operator; (c) forward AMSCRs to the air navigation services provider in a manner that will permit its prompt dissemination to aircraft operators; (d) provide the aeronautical information publications provider with information, for publication in the Canada Flight Supplement, about the availability of CRFIs and AMSCRs; and (e) include in the airport operations manual airport information about the availability of CRFIs and AMSCRs. (2) Despite paragraph (1)(b), the operator of the airport shall not include friction readings in an AMSCR if those friction readings are obtained from a runway surface using a decelerometer and if (a) the runway surface is wet or damp but there is no contaminant; (b) on the runway surface there is a layer of slush but no other contaminant; (c) on the runway surface there is wet snow that, when stepped on or driven on, splatters, turns to slush or results in the presence of visible water; or (d) on the runway surface there is loose snow or wet snow that exceeds 2.5 cm (1 inch) in depth. Training 302.418 (1) The operator of an airport shall not assign duties in respect of its airport winter maintenance plan to a person unless that person has received training from the operator on those duties and on the matters set out in section 322.418 of the Airport Standards — Airport Winter Maintenance. (2) The operator of the airport shall not assign supervisory duties in respect of its airport winter maintenance plan to a person unless the person has received training on those duties and on the content of the plan. (3) Each year, before the start of winter maintenance operations, the operator of the airport shall provide persons who will be assigned duties in respect of its airport winter maintenance plan with training on any amendments that have been made to the plan since the previous winter. (4) Training provided under this section shall be competency-based with an emphasis on performance, and shall include written or practical examinations. Training Records 302.419 The operator of an airport shall keep a training record for each person who receives any training under section 302.418, and shall keep the record for five years after the day on which the latest training was received. [302.420 to 302.499 reserved] Coming into Force 4 These Regulations come into force on the first anniversary of the day on which they are published in the Canada Gazette Part II. [22-1-o] Footnote 1 http://www.cacairports.ca/canadas_airports Footnote 2 https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/publications/tp312-menu4765.htm Footnote 3 https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/opssvs/managementservices-referencecentre-acs-300-302-013-1728.htm Footnote 4 SOR/96-433 Footnote a S.C. 2014, c. 39, s. 144 Footnote b S.C. 2015, c. 20, s. 12 Footnote c S.C. 2004, c. 15, s. 18 Footnote d R.S., c. A-2

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